With today being our launch day in Allston, we decided to investigate how the town came to be what it is today. You may be surprised at what we found!

1. Allston-Brighton was called "Little Cambridge" beginning in 1634. This was the year that Cambridge took ownership of Allston-Brighton. Eventually, residents sought independence from Cambridge in 1807.

Photo source: bahistory.org

Photo source: bahistory.org

2. To supply provisions to General Washington's army, the Winship family founded the Brighton Cattle Market in 1776. According to Dr. William P. Marchione, "The selling and butchering of cattle became the economic mainstay of the town for more than a century, profoundly influencing virtually every aspect of Brighton's economic, political, and social development."

Photo source: bahistory.org

Photo source: bahistory.org

3. The Allston branch of the Boston Public Library was once housed on the second floor of the building at the intersection of Glenville Ave and Harvard Ave. According to Historic Boston Incorporated, this building is the "largest commercial building in the district" and now houses small office spaces.

Photo source: bahistory.org

Photo source: bahistory.org

4. The east region of Brighton is named after the Romantic painter and Harvard graduate, Washington Allston. His namesake initially was used to identify the new post office in the neighborhood.

"A Rising of a Thunderstorm at Sea" (1804)

"A Rising of a Thunderstorm at Sea" (1804)

5. According to Doug Most's book A Race Underground, the first electric streetcar ride in the US took place from Allston on September 1, 1897. Pretty cool to consider Allston a part of transit history!

Photo source: bahistory.org

Photo source: bahistory.org

Our current route from Allston stops at Copley, Downtown, and Seaport. Be sure to sign up to experience a comfortable and direct commute at go.bridj.com!

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